Edinburgh Whisky

I was introduced to Edinburgh Whisky by fellow blogger Whisky Apocalypse. They are a new(ish) company based (unsurprisingly) in Edinburgh and were kind enough to send me some samples.

 
Edinburgh Whisky Ltd, New Town Blend ‘Advocates Batch’, 43% abv, (available here)

The nose is unmistakably Speyside. Very floral and perfumed with honey elements underneath a slight malty and biscuit note. The palate is very much as you would expect, again perfumed and mildly honeyed but with the added addition of some citrus notes. Deep underneath I seemed to find a slight vegetal earthy note I can only describe as parsnip-esque.  The finish is quite light, delicate and dry with hints of rye bread, heather and the slightest hint of brine.

Admittedly I wasn’t too keen on this initially. Upon a second tasting I found it much more palatable. Still cant put my finger on why. Delicate, well balanced and a decent blend for the price.

 

Edinburgh Whisky Ltd, Glenlivet, 46%, 8 y.o, IB, (available here)

The nose has elements of malt, apricot, honey and perfume with some gooseberry, melon and raisin undertones.  Only on the palate does the first fill sherry cask become really apparent. The raisins and darker elements pop out alongside a sweeter fruity note. There is a nice buttery and vanilla feeling with a very marginal element of green wood underneath.  The finish is of medium length with a slight butteriness followed by floral vanilla notes, some tea tannins and a woody, drying undertone.

 

Edinburgh Whisky Ltd, Highland Park, 15 y.o, 46% abv, IB, (available here)

I’ve never before tried an IB of Highland Park so was very much looking forward to sampling this.

The nose has some very restrained and yet sweet peat. There are coconut, vanilla, peach and tea notes wrapped up in the wisps of smoke.  Given time a brine note appears.  The palate is delicate and light. Vanilla pods toasted by light peat smoke. Butter, honey and apricots emerge over tangy brine and mild wood notes.  On the finish the peat fades to leave vanilla, brine soaked raisins and toasted oak with a superb dark chocolate bitterness emerging.

Out of the three bottles this was by far my favourite. Not to say the others are bad – far from it.  The Highland Park just seemed to suit my palate much better. Constantly shifting flavours with both depth and width. Very much one to try and enjoy.

 

 

 

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